Mexico top sending country for immigrants to NC in 2015

After the Great Recession, the volume of Mexican immigration to the United States—and North Carolina—dropped sharply. Between 2009 and 2014, the Pew Hispanic Center found that more Mexican immigrants had returned to Mexico than immigrated to the U.S., with an estimated net migration of -140,000 individuals. During this same time period, Asian countries, such as China and India, emerged as leading senders of immigrants. Similar trends were documented in North Carolina.

New data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey indicate changing patterns in North Carolina but not the nation. Nationally, India and China remain the leading sources of new immigrants to America. In 2015, the U.S. received 180,000 immigrants from India and 143,000 from China compared to 139,000 from Mexico.

In North Carolina, immigration from Mexico more than doubled between 2014 and 2015, rising from just under 3,500 to nearly 7,400. The volume of Mexican immigration to the state in 2015 was greater than the combined volume of immigration from both China (3,500) and India (3,400).

mexico-leading-source-of-nc-immigrants-for-first-time-since-2015

Although there have been large continued flows of Mexican immigrants into the state since 2005, North Carolina’s Mexican population has not grown as much as populations born in other countries. Continue reading

Posted in Carolina Demographics, Migration | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Mexico top sending country for immigrants to NC in 2015

The North Carolina Electorate: North Carolina-born voters

majority-of-nc-voting-eligible-are-nc-born

Over half (54%) of North Carolina’s voting-eligible (18+ citizen) population is North Carolina born, according to estimates from the 2014 American Community Survey. This is slightly below the national proportion of 56% of eligible voters born in their current state of residence. Louisiana has the highest proportion of state native potential voters at 77% while Nevada has by far the lowest rate. Just 14% of Nevada’s voting-eligible residents were born in Nevada.

As individuals moved to North Carolina from other states and countries over the past few decades, the state share of North Carolina-born potential voters has declined. Continue reading

Posted in Elections & Voting | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on The North Carolina Electorate: North Carolina-born voters

The North Carolina Electorate: Asian & Hispanic Voters

North Carolina’s population is rapidly diversifying. Since 2000, the state’s Asian population has more than doubled, increasing from 114,000 to 268,000, a growth rate of 136%. The Hispanic population has grown at a similar pace, with even more significant numeric increases. In 2000, North Carolina had 379,000 Hispanic residents. By 2015, the Hispanic population was nearly 912,000, an increase of more than half a million or 141% over fifteen years.

This diversity is not fully reflected in the state’s electorate, however. Just 2.3% of North Carolina’s active, registered voters identify as Hispanic compared to 9.1% of the total population. Similarly, Asian voters comprised 1.1% of North Carolina registered voters while making up 2.7% of the total population. What accounts for these differences?

First, North Carolina’s Asian and Hispanic residents are younger than the national average, making them more likely to be ineligible to vote due to age. In 2015:

  • 37% of NC Hispanics were under 18 compared to 32% nationwide.
  • 24% of NC Asians were under 18 compared to 20% nationwide.

In addition, North Carolina Asian and Hispanic adults are less likely to be eligible to vote due to citizenship status. Nearly all of North Carolina black and white adults are eligible to vote (9%). In contrast, just 60% of North Carolina’s Asian adults are citizens compared to 68% of Asians nationwide. Less than half of North Carolina’s Hispanic adults are citizens—47%—the lowest rate of any state in the nation.

nc-asian-and-hispanic-adults-less-likely-to-be-voting-eligible

Among the voting eligible populations, current voter registration data indicates lower registration rates among Asian and Hispanic adults. Continue reading

Posted in Elections & Voting | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on The North Carolina Electorate: Asian & Hispanic Voters

NC in Focus: Who are NC’s Democratic voters?

As of October 1st, North Carolina had 5.6 million active, registered voters. Of these, 2.2 million or 40% were registered as a Democrat.

Age

Older voters are the most likely to register as a Democrat, partly reflecting the legacy of the “Solid South.” Nearly 1 in 2 voters ages 75 and older—48%—are registered Democrats compared to 35% of 18-34 year-olds, 37% of 35-54 year-olds, and 43% of voters ages 55-74. As a result, older adults comprise a larger share of the state’s Democratic voters than the overall electorate.

age-composition-of-nc-democrat

Reflecting this age structure, North Carolina’s registered Democrats have the highest proportion of voters registered before 1990: 22% compared to 20% of Republicans and 7% of unaffiliated voters.

Race/ethnicity

While North Carolina’s registered Republicans are overwhelmingly white, registered Democrats are much more likely to be black. Continue reading

Posted in Elections & Voting | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on NC in Focus: Who are NC’s Democratic voters?

NC in Focus: Who are NC’s Republican voters?

As of October 1st, North Carolina had 5.6 million active, registered voters. Of these, 1.8 million or 31% were registered as Republican.

Age

Younger voters are the least likely to register as Republican, reflecting their higher affinity for registering unaffiliated. Just 25% of voters ages 18-34 are registered Republican compared to 32% of 35-54 year-olds, 34% of 55-74 year-olds, and 35% of voters ages 75 and older. As a result, older adults, especially those ages 55-74, comprise a larger share of Republican voters than the overall electorate (36% vs. 33%).

age-composition-republican-voters

North Carolina’s registered Republicans have generally been in the state slightly longer than non-registered Republicans. Continue reading

Posted in Elections & Voting | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on NC in Focus: Who are NC’s Republican voters?